Direct Mail: Avoiding The Junk Mail Feeling

canstockphoto0894036Unlike e-mail accounts or Facebook notifications, direct mail comes just once a day. Still, there are opportunities for marketers to impact the habits of consumers via this medium. However, all marketers must first ensure that they are not coming off in a “junk mail” way.

Defining Junk Mail

What is the difference between a legitimate piece of marketing material and junk mail? Simply put, one provides useful information to a consumer about a product they might like to buy. The other gives unsolicited information about something wholly irrelevant to the receiver. Businessinsider.com defines it this way,

In it’s worst form, organizations send unwanted mailings to people that are not interested in the products being promoted. Of course, unwanted mailings are also known as “junk” mail,…

No one wants to land in the junk mail category. Shaping direct marketing campaigns around avoiding this label is prudent.

How To Make A Helpful Direct Marketing Piece 

In order to make a piece that is not considered junk, it is first helpful to understand one’s audience. Different demographics are clearly more likely to have an interest in different products. A little market research (and sometimes just a little common sense) can show which target audiences appear the most receptive to a product.

As an audience becomes defined, messaging to them becomes the critical issue. Again, each audience is different and understands communication in different ways. Younger audiences may prefer a more casual tone that explains why they need the product and how specifically it will benefit them. An older generation audience is likely to want a deeper relationship with the product and the company they do business with.

Striking the right chord and balance is how a piece of mail goes from throw away garbage to something that calls someone to action.

Contact us for more information on direct mail pieces and how to avoid junk mail.

 

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