Does Snail Mail Still Hold Any Marketing Value?

canstockphoto10738272Do a quick search for “snail mail” or the “United States Postal Service” and you are sure to find dozens of articles about how this means of communicating is disappearing. Before you jump on that snail mail bashing bandwagon, think about some of the ways that snail mail may in fact still hold marketing value.

The Excitement Is Real 

It is difficult to deny that most of us still get some thrill out of checking our mailbox. Many of the items contained in that mailbox are of little to no value to us, but that does not stop us from looking. Kern Lewis, a contributor for Forbes.com, wrote the following about the value of snail mail,

I still get a stream of credit card solicitations from the big banks via direct mail, and not via e-mail (partly for security issues). Response rates on these mailings must make them worth doing, or Chase, Wells Fargo, et al., would not run these campaigns.

He asserts that obviously there is still value in snail mail promotional pieces, or else they wouldn’t exist in the first place!

What Companies Must Do To Make Direct Mail Work

In order to make direct mail pieces work, one must put in place a few elements that work. A couple of traits of a successful direct mail piece are as follows:

Generous- A mail piece should make the receiver feel very important. They should almost feel as though they have been invited into an exclusive club or otherwise rewarded in some way just for receiving the piece of mail.

A Unique Feel- Who would want to open a piece of mail that looks just like all of the others? This is why successful direct mail campaigns start with creating something that has a unique feeling to it.

With these two elements in tact, a direct mail piece has a higher chance of being a successful hit with those who receive it.

Please contact us for more information on direct mail pieces and how they are still relevant in our world today.

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